Prof quits ‘civil discourse’ committee, says it’s ‘miserable’ to work with ‘evil’ conservative students

It seems there’s a lot of hatred for conservatives on modern colleges these days.  On Wednesday, Campus Reform reported that Jennifer McErlean, a philosophy professor at Siena College, left a committee on civil discourse because the thought of working with “evil” conservative students made her “miserable.”

According to Campus Reform:

In an email obtained by Campus Reform, professor Jennifer McErlean strongly condemned the conservative students on her campus, voicing her desire to protest the upcoming “Let Freedom Ring” conference that is slated to feature several prominent political figures including investigative journalist James O’Keefe, lobbyist Roger Stone, and others.

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The email appears to be part of a broader discussion chain between Turning Point USA Chapter President Antonio Bianchi and a university alumnus. While the professor addressed her grievances to the alumnus, she also copied Bianchi on the email, which personally berates him and another conservative student for their activism.

“I believe [Bianchi] greatly exaggerates the number of ‘conservative’ students who agree with his position (they are a small band) and his description of them feeling threatened borders on the ridiculous,” she wrote.

“I withdrew from the committee that has been formed to figure out ways of productive civil discourse on such matters – it was making me miserable thinking of how to work with students like Antonio!” she said, adding that “this way I am free to protest at the conference, IF there is any protest.”

Bianchi condemned McErlean on Facebook, saying she “exemplified everything wrong with collegiate bias and discrimination against conservative students in an email directed at me this morning.”

McErlean also expressed concern there would not be a significant counter-protest of the conservative events, Campus Reform added.

“I’m still worried that so many groups are thinking about doing ‘something’ that nothing will result,” she wrote. “Faculty will surely have forums that counter and are more inclusive on issues like free speech and gun rights the week before and the week after – but if no silent, sign-carrying wall of people is there to greet the conference goers I fear the message is that Siena is generally happy with the list of speakers and there will be no acknowledgment of how evil these organizations are!”

Bianchi told Campus Reform that professors “have tried to stop us every step of the way and this is just an unfiltered view of how they see conservatives on campus.”

And he’s not alone.  Another conservative student told Campus Reform that she “as well as many other conservatives (especially during the election) were afraid to walk around campus alone because they voted for Trump or were conservative.”

Stories like these are becoming more frequent as liberals — especially those on college campuses across America — are becoming more hateful, radicalized and tyrannical in the age of Trump.

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