Rasmussen: Only 16% think ‘police-free society’ is likely


New York Police Benevolent Association President Mike O’Meara passionately defended law enforcement from criticism during a Tuesday presser. (Screen snip, YouTube, Red Pill News)

A new Rasmussen survey said Thursday that “just 16% of voters think the “police-free society” envisioned by Minneapolis City Council President Lisa Bender is even somewhat likely for most communities in this country, with only seven percent (7%) who say it’s Very Likely.”

According to Rasmussen’s national telephone and online survey, 56 percent of likely voters agree with President Donald Trump that “our police have been letting us live in peace.”

At the same time, the survey revealed, “50% also agree with putative Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden that the federal government should determine government aid to local police based on whether police departments meet ‘certain basic standards of decency and honorableness.’

“Twenty-seven percent (27%) don’t share that view. Nearly as many (24%) are undecided,” Rasmussen said.

Law enforcement has been under fire since the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis two weeks ago. He died while being held on the ground by a Minneapolis police officer who kept a knee on Floyd’s neck for more than eight minutes.

A separate Rasmussen survey found that only 27 percent of American adults think reducing police budgets is a good idea. Fifty-nine percent opposed cutting their local police budgets.
That survey also found that Republicans (16%) are “more reluctant than Democrats (29%)” and Independents (32%) to reduce local funding for police.

On Tuesday, New York Police Benevolent Association President Mike O’Meara delivered impassioned remarks at a press event in which he defended rank-and-file police officers and declared that the fired Minneapolis cop now charged in Floyd’s death “killed someone, we didn’t.”

In Seattle, police are in the crosshairs of protesters who have seized several blocks in the Capitol Hill area, who have issued a set of demands that include abolition of the police department.

Rasmussen noted that only 17 percent of all American s think there are too many police officers, while 38 percent think there are not enough police, which is down from the 51 percent who held that view in 2014. Thirty-five percent think the number of commissioned police officers is “about right,” Rasmussen said.

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