Rasmussen: 83% predict Kavanaugh will be confirmed

A new Rasmussen survey released Wednesday shows that a whopping 83percent of likely U.S. voters believe that Judge Brett Kavanaugh will be confirmed by the Senate to succeed retiring Justice Anthony Kennedy, but surprisingly, only 44 percent believe that he should be confirmed, based on what they know about him right now.

Rasmussen is reporting that 83% of likely voters expect Judge Brett Kavanaugh to be confirmed to the Supreme Court. (Snip, YouTube, C-SPAN)

The survey was conducted with 1,000 likely voters on July 10 with a margin of sampling error of +/- 3 percentage points, Rasmussen said.

The nomination has, as best-selling author Frank Miniter noted in an opinion piece at Fox News, caused liberals to “freak out.” That’s because Kavanaugh can “clearly and honestly interpret the Constitution,” according to Miniter.

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Translation: Judge Kavanaugh isn’t someone who makes things up from the bench, he follows the Constitution and legal history of cases.

For the political Left, it’s about guns, and the fear that the Second Amendment could, for a third time in recent memory, be interpreted by the high court as meaning what it says.
Miniter, who has been on the New York Times best seller list with The Ultimate Man’s Survival Guide in 2009, threw down something of a challenge to Kavanaugh opponents who worry about expanded gun rights.

“What other constitutionally protected right is given such a test,” he asks. “Can the government also decide which law-abiding citizens really need their right to free speech or religion? How about who gets due process under the law?”

Too many on the Left think gun ownership should be a heavily-regulated government privilege, not a constitutionally protected fundamental right.

According to Rasmussen, when Neil Gorsuch was nominated last year, 51 percent of likely voters said he should have been confirmed, which he was. Forty-five percent supported Judge Sonia Sotomayor when she was nominated by Barack Obama, and “just 33 % felt the Senate should confirm Elena Kagan,” Rasmussen recalled.

Kavanaugh will be run through the gauntlet before he is confirmed, and part of that will be from what might be a hostile press. There appears to be little question that the “mainstream” news media is decidedly liberal, and they’re not too friendly towards firearms.

As Miniter recalled in his Op-Ed, “I’ll never forget the time I sat in the press section in the balcony of the Supreme Court during the Heller hearing. When Justice Kennedy tipped his hand that he reads the Second Amendment to mean what it says, a liberal journalist next me sighed as if in pain: ‘Oh, no.’”

Second Amendment activists are already contacting the Senate, encouraging Kavanaugh’s confirmation. While he may not have been everyone’s first choice on the right, the reality is he will be much better on Second Amendment issues than anyone who would have been nominated by a President Hillary Clinton, who famously said on the campaign trail that she thought the high court was “wrong” on the Heller ruling in 2008.

The Left wants to reverse the Heller ruling, Miniter notes, explaining that this was clear in the dissents in that case. By placing Kavanaugh on the court, it appears to both sides of the gun debate that reversing Heller will be off the table, and maybe that is what the hubbub is really all about.

 

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