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Rasmussen: 62% say they pay more than ‘fair share’ of taxes; What it buys

White House leaks
The White House has a proposed 2023 budget. What to see what your tax money may buy? (Wikimedia Commons)

A new Rasmussen survey released Tuesday says 62 percent of American adults believe they pay more than their fair share of taxes, including 71 percent of Republicans 62 percent of Democrats and 54 percent of Independents.

The survey also revealed 62 percent of men and 57 percent of women think they’re paying more than their fair share.

Conservative Firing Line did some digging to learn what your tax money is buying, or at least recommended to purchase, all detailed in the proposed 2023 budget released by the Biden administration. Readers may find this interesting. Here are some of the highlights:

  • The Budget requests $127.3 billion in discretionary funding for Health and Human Services, a $26.9 billion or 26.8- percent increase from the 2021 enacted level, excluding amounts requested for the Indian Health Service (IHS), which the Budget proposes to shift from discretionary to mandatory funding. This request includes appropriations for 21st Century Cures Act and program integrity activities.
  • Another $48.2 billion in discretionary funding for the Department of Energy, a $6.3 billion or 15.1-percent increase from the 2021 enacted level. Resources provided through the 2023 Budget complement major investments in clean energy demonstrations, advanced manufacturing, grid infrastructure, and low-income home weatherization funded in the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act (Bipartisan Infrastructure Law).
  • The Budget wants $88.3 billion in discretionary funding for the Department of Education, a $15.3 billion or 20.9-percent increase from the 2021 enacted level.
  • The Budget requests $773 billion in discretionary funding for the Department of Defense, a $69 billion or 9.8-percent increase from the 2021 enacted level. This two-year growth enables DOD to make the investments necessary to execute the Administration’s Interim National Security Strategic Guidance and forthcoming National Security Strategy and National Defense Strategy.
  • The Budget seeks $11.7 billion in discretionary funding for Commerce, a $2.8 billion or 31.2-percent increase from the 2021 enacted level. Resources provided through the 2023 Budget complement major investments in broadband Internet access and climate resilience through the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act (Bipartisan Infrastructure Law).
  • The Budget requests $28.5 billion in discretionary funding for the Department of Agriculture, a $4.2 billion or 17.1-percent increase from the 2021 enacted level, excluding Food for Peace Title II Grants, which is included in the State and International Programs total. Resources provided through the 2023 Budget complement investments in conservation, forest management, and broadband deployment provided in the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act (Bipartisan Infrastructure Law).
  • The Budget requests $56.7 billion in discretionary funding for the Department of Homeland Security, a $2.9 billion or 5.4-percent increase from the 2021 enacted level. Resources provided through the 2023 Budget complement investments in cybersecurity, hazard mitigation, and others areas provided in the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act (Bipartisan Infrastructure Law).
  • They’re asking $71.9 billion in discretionary funding for HUD, a $12.3 billion or 21-percent increase from the 2021 enacted level.
  • The Budget requests $17.5 billion in discretionary funding for the Department of Interior, a $2.8 billion or 19.3-percent increase from the 2021 enacted level, excluding amounts requested for Contract Support Costs and Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act of 1975 Section 105(l) leases, which the Budget proposes to shift from discretionary to mandatory funding. Resources provided through the 2023 Budget complement major investments in wildfire management, tribal programs, methane emissions reduction, abandoned mine land reclamation, western water infrastructure, and ecosystem restoration through the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act (Bipartisan Infrastructure Law).
  • They want $37.7 billion in discretionary funding for the Department of Justice, a $4.2 billion or nearly 13-percent increase from the 2021 enacted level. This includes an “investment” in Federal Law Enforcement to Combat Gun Crime and Other Violent Crime. “The Budget makes robust investments to bolster Federal law enforcement capacity. The Budget includes $17.4 billion, an increase of $1.7 billion above the 2021 enacted level, for DOJ law enforcement including a total of $1.7 billion for the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives (ATF) to expand multijurisdictional gun trafficking strike forces with additional personnel, increase regulation of the firearms industry, enhance ATF’s National Integrated Ballistic Information Network, and modernize the National Tracing Center. The Budget includes $1.8 billion for the U.S. Marshals Service to support personnel dedicated to fighting violent crime, including through fugitive apprehension and enforcement operations. The Budget also provides the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) with an additional $69 million to address violent crime, including violent crimes against children and crime in Indian Country. In addition, the Budget provides the U.S. Attorneys with $72.1 million to prosecute violent crimes.”
  • The Budget requests $14.6 billion in discretionary funding for Department of Labor, a $2.2 billion or 18-percent increase from the 2021 enacted level.
  • The Budget wants $67.6 billion in discretionary funding for the Department of State and other international programs, a $10.2 billion or 18-percent increase from the 2021 enacted level, excluding emergency funding. Within this total, the Budget includes $60.4 billion for the Department of State and USAID, an increase of $7.4 billion or 14 percent above the 2021 enacted levels. This Budget also includes $4.4 billion for the international programs at the Department of the Treasury, an increase of $2.5 billion or 131 percent above the 2021 enacted level.
  • The Budget requests $26.8 billion in discretionary budget authority for the Department of Transportation, a $1.5 billion or six-percent increase from the 2021 enacted level. Consistent with the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, the Budget also includes $78.4 billion in mandatory funds, including contract authority and obligation limitations, and $36.8 billion in emergency-designated advance budget authority, for transportation infrastructure investments in 2023.
  • The Budget requests $16.2 billion in discretionary funding for Treasury, a $2.7 billion or 20-percent increase from the 2021 enacted level.
  • The Budget requests $135 billion in discretionary funding for the VA, a $31 billion or 29-percent increase, from the 2021 enacted level. The Budget also includes $128 billion in advance appropriations for VA medical care programs in 2024.
  • The Budget requests $6.6 billion in discretionary funding for the Corps of Engineers. Resources provided through the 2023 Budget complement historic investments in modernizing the Nation’s ports and waterways and improving resilience of water resources infrastructure to climate change through the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act (Bipartisan Infrastructure Law).
  • The Budget requests $11.9 billion in discretionary funding for EPA, a $2.6 billion or 29-percent increase from the 2021 enacted level. Resources provided through the 2023 Budget complement investments in water infrastructure, including lead pipe replacements, and in the remediation of contaminated and idle land provided in the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act (Bipartisan Infrastructure Law).
  • The Budget requests $26 billion in discretionary funding for NASA, a $2.7 billion or 11.6-percent increase from the 2021 enacted level
  • The Budget requests $14.8 billion in discretionary funding for the Social Security Administration, a $1.8 billion or 14-percent increase from the 2021 enacted level, including funding for program integrity activities.

And if you go through the proposed budget, you will find references sprinkled throughout about climate. Expect things to get pretty hot…tempered, perhaps…on April 15, which is the deadline for paying your income taxes.

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