Obama whines: ‘I’m being forced out’ of the White House

Obama tells the Golf Channel he's being forced out of the presidency.Just before playing his 300th (that’s right, 300th) game of golf as President of the United States, Barack Hussein Obama whined that he’s being “forced” to leave the White House.

“I’m not a hack, but I’m not quitting my day job,” he told the Golf Channel’s David Feherty.

“Actually you are quitting your day job fairly shortly,” Feherty said, reminding Obama that his term officially ends next January.

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“Well then I may get good,” Obama lightheartedly quipped before adding, “I’m being forced out, I didn’t quit.”

Here’s video, posted to Twitter by Charlie Spiering:

The Golf Channel provided a bit of cover for Obama, adding:

Obama does play regularly. According to CBS, Obama played his 300th round of golf as president Sunday while on vacation in Martha’s Vineyard. He’s still about 500 rounds short of President Dwight D. Eisenhower’s number of rounds while in office, and Obama is about 700 rounds short of Woodrow Wilson.

Obama also told Feherty his bunker shots are terrible.

“I think at this point it must be psychological,” Obama said of his poor sand game.

Poor baby…

H/T Breitbart.com

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