Liberals fall for fake story about Trump watching ‘The Gorilla Channel’ 17 hours per day

A lot of excerpts of Michael Wolff’s anti-Trump book, “Fire and Fury,” are reportedly making the rounds on the Internet, but not all of them are true.  Some are not only fictitious (as is a good part of the book, according to some reports), but they actually quite hilarious.  One “excert” making the rounds claims Trump wanted to watch “The Gorilla Channel.”  Of course, it wasn’t true, but liberals fell for it anyway.

According to Ben Shapiro, Twitter user @pixelatedboat tweeted out a parody segment supposedly lifted from Wolff’s book.

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According to Shapiro:

There was only one problem. People took the story seriously.

As @pixelatedboat tweeted, the whole purpose of his story was to show how ridiculous Wolff’s coverage was — that he had merely retold random, wild anecdotes in an attempt to sell books, without any effort to corroborate those anecdotes. Instead, people just took the parody seriously, thinking it was real. That’s because confirmation bias drives too many people to believe stories that are too good to disbelieve. Thus, official #Resistance leader Scott Dworkin tweeted:

Trump-Russia conspiracy theorist Eric Garland also fell for the hoax:

According to The Hill:

Several major and verified accounts on Twitter shared the parody as if it were an actual excerpt from the book, while others speculated whether it was real. Some fell for the parody and believed Trump had demanded another “gorilla channel.” Other Twitter users said they thought the the fake “gorilla channel” excerpt actually was in Wolff’s book, but was untrue.

At press time on Friday, “Gorilla Channel” was trending on Twitter, with more than 16,000 tweets.

One person asked:

MSNBC admitted on one post that the story is fake, but anti-Trump propagandist Joy Reid claimed: “There may be a reason that story would ring true.”

Here’s video, if you can stand it:

Shapiro said that “people will believe anything that’s convenient for them to believe, particularly about President Trump.”

Worse yet, he said, there can never be a real Gorilla Channel…

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