Judge Releases Previously Deported Mexican National Over Objections of Prosecutors

 

Boston, Massachusetts – Mexican national Bulmaro Enriquez, 32, has been previously deported 9 (NINE) times. One June 7, a Federal judge released him on bail over the objections of prosecutors.

The US Attorney’s office in Boston released this statement on June 7:

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A Mexican national with nine prior deportations was released from federal custody today after a bail review hearing in federal court in Boston.

Bulmaro Enriquez, 32, was indicted on April 26, 2018, on one count of illegal reentry of a deported alien. He was released from federal custody today after agreeing to post the equity in his girlfriend’s home for the secured bond at a bail review hearing.

According to court documents, Enriquez has been deported from the United States nine times. Most recently, Enriquez was convicted in January 2016 in federal court in Boston of illegal reentry of a deported alien, sentenced to time-served, and deported to Mexico.

Leading up to his most recent deportation, Enriquez was convicted of possession of a controlled substance after a federal search warrant executed at his home in Framingham revealed one and a half pounds of marijuana, electric scales, and other drug distribution paraphernalia.

According to court records, in addition to his 2015 and 2016 convictions for drug possession and illegal reentry, Enriquez was convicted in 2003 of escape; 2004 of OUI; 2006 of OUI; 2006 of possession of a controlled substance; and in 2007 of OUI. [Note: OUI is “operating under the influence.”]

Enriquez currently faces a sentence of no greater than 10 years in prison, up to three years of supervised release, a fine of $250,000, and will be subject to deportation proceedings. Sentences are imposed by a federal district court judge based upon the U.S. Sentencing Guidelines and other statutory factors.

Prosecutors stated that Enriquez had demonstrated a “lack of respect for the Laws of the United States” by being deported 9 times and returning.

The Boston Herald reported,

Last month, Enriquez failed to appear for a jury trial on charges of domestic assault and battery, according to court records. Enriquez allegedly began arguing with his wife after she refused sex, according to a Framingham police report which stated that Enriquez tried to drag his wife back inside their house after she tried to leave.

“He is the definition of someone who should be held in custody pending deportation,” said Jessica Vaughan, director of policy studies at the Center for Immigration Studies. “I cannot for the life of me think why a magistrate would let him out on bail.”

So why did the judge let him out? Because the defense attorney Jennifer Pucci said, “He is not someone who enters the country to live under other names and commit crimes; rather, he is someone who returns to the United States repeatedly, at great personal risk, to live in his family home, with his U.S. citizen children, and to support his family financially.”

Back up a minute.  He was charged with domestic assault (crime), driving under the influence of drugs (crime), entering the United States illegally (crime), possession of controlled substance (crime), escape (crime)… he’s just a poor Mexican guy who wants to be with his family. And smoke dope then drive to endanger others on the road. And drag his girlfriend/wife around.

H/T Uncle Sam’s Misguided Children

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